Ketanji Brown Jackson sworn in to supreme court after ruling deals blow to climate crisis – as it happened

Jackson sworn in as first Black female supreme court justiceSupreme court hobbles government power to limit emissionsBiden can end Trump’s ‘Remain in Mexico’, supreme court rulesBiden supports changing filibuster rules to codify RoeJanuary 6 panel subpoenas former White House counselSign up to receive First Thing – our daily briefing by emailDemocrats and environmental groups are fuming over the Supreme Court’s decision in West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, which has dramatic consequences for the administration’s climate ambitions but also for the world’s ability to cut emissions at the speed and scale scientists say are needed to avert catastrophic climate chang..

The Guardian > Law Ketanji Brown Jackson sworn in to supreme court after ruling deals blow to climate crisis – as it happened

Supreme court expands states’ power to prosecute crimes on tribal lands

Cherokee nation says ruling represents attack on tribe’s sovereignty but Oklahoma governor hails ‘pivotal moment’A US supreme court decision on Wednesday that allows state prosecutors to pursue criminal cases for crimes committed by non-Native persons against Native persons on tribal land has spurred condemnation from tribal leaders and members – who have described the ruling as an attack on their autonomy.This ruling stems from the state criminal case Oklahoma v Castro-Huerta. Victor Castro-Huerta was charged by Oklahoma state prosecutors in 2015 for neglecting his five-year-old stepdaughter, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Castro-Huerta, who is not a Native, abuse..

The Guardian > Law Supreme court expands states’ power to prosecute crimes on tribal lands

US supreme court rules against EPA and hobbles government power to limit harmful emissions

Court sides with Republican states as ruling represents landmark moment in rightwing effort to dismantle ‘regulatory state’The US supreme court has sided with Republican-led states to in effect hobble the federal government’s ability to tackle the climate crisis, in a ruling that will have profound implications for the government’s overall regulatory power.In a 6-3 decision that will seriously hinder America’s ability to stave off disastrous global heating, the supreme court, which became dominated by rightwing justices under the Trump administration, has opted to support a case brought by West Virginia that demands the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) be limited in how it ..

The Guardian > Law US supreme court rules against EPA and hobbles government power to limit harmful emissions

Virginia lawsuits indicate pattern of schools ignoring reported sexual assaults

Two lawsuits are back in front of federal judges, drawing scrutiny to schools’ failure to support students who report assaultsA pair of lawsuits that for years has plagued Virginia’s largest school system with allegations that it ignored students’ accusations of sex assaults are back in front of federal judges.One of the lawsuits includes allegations of horrific abuse suffered by a student at a Fairfax county middle school and was the basis for a 2014 federal investigation. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Virginia lawsuits indicate pattern of schools ignoring reported sexual assaults

Post Office IT scandal whistleblowers to share £20m compensation pot

‘Courageous’ former operators to share interim package amid continued fallout from faulty Horizon systemFormer post office operators who helped to uncover the Horizon IT scandal are to receive £19.5m compensation from the government.The interim compensation package will be made available by ministers to the eligible members of a group representing postal workers who were the first to take legal action against the Post Office, taking the total compensation made to those wrongly accused of stealing money to about £30m. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Post Office IT scandal whistleblowers to share £20m compensation pot

Home Office to face legal challenge over post-Brexit rights of EU citizens in UK

High court allows judicial review of rules that remove rights of those who do not apply for residency in timeToday’s politics news – live updatesA statutory body set up to monitor EU citizens’ rights after Brexit has been granted permission for a judicial review of Home Office rules which impact up to 2.5 million European nationals living in the UK.The Independent Monitoring Authority (IMA) applied to the high court to challenge a Home Office decision to remove the rights of people living in the UK for less than five years before Brexit if they do not apply in time for permanent residency status. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Home Office to face legal challenge over post-Brexit rights of EU citizens in UK

The Roe ruling is not about states’ rights. It’s about power and control | Derecka Purnell

It’s tempting to blame rightwing evangelicals for what happened last week – but big business also benefits from our loss of autonomyI found out about Dobbs, the supreme court’s recent decision that overturned Roe v Wade and Planned Parenthood v Casey, in a room full of Black women in Boston. One interrupted a conference panel discussion and made the announcement. Gasps, groans, and murmurs followed. I rushed outside and wept briefly on the phone while breaking the news to loved ones. The state of affairs is profoundly unfair. Not only did the court erase the federal protection of abortion rights and access, but Justice Clarence Thomas additionally called for the review and overturning ..

The Guardian > Law The Roe ruling is not about states’ rights. It’s about power and control | Derecka Purnell

William Tyrrell’s foster mother denied mental health application over alleged assault of young girl

Magistrate dismisses application for woman’s charges of assault and intimidation to be dealt with under Mental Health ActFollow our Australia news live blog for the latest updatesGet our free news app, morning email briefing and daily news podcastWilliam Tyrrell’s foster mother, who allegedly kicked and assaulted a child with a wooden spoon, has had her mental health application dismissed.The woman known as SD, who cannot be named for legal reasons, appeared alongside her partner and foster father of William at a Parramatta local court hearing on Thursday.Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law William Tyrrell’s foster mother denied mental health application over alleged assault of young girl

Fossil fuel industry faces surge in climate lawsuits

Number of climate-related lawsuits globally has doubled since 2015, with quarter filed in past two yearsThe world’s most polluting companies are increasingly being targeted by lawsuits challenging their inaction on climate change and attempts to spread misinformation, according to a new report.Research by the London School of Economics Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment found a surge in legal cases against the fossil fuel industry over the past year – especially outside the US – and growing action in other corporate sectors. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Fossil fuel industry faces surge in climate lawsuits

Minister complains to Speaker about Labour rape conviction remarks

Victoria Atkins says Ellie Reeves should retract statement that government had ‘let off rapists and let survivors down’A Home Office minister has privately written to the House of Commons Speaker to complain about the language used by a Labour frontbencher, suggesting she should be made to correct her remarks on rape convictions.Victoria Atkins suggested in her letter to Sir Lindsay Hoyle that her Labour counterpart would deter victims by saying the government “let off rapists and let survivors down”. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Minister complains to Speaker about Labour rape conviction remarks

‘There were plans to poison Julian’: Ithaka, the film charting Assange’s fight for freedom

From his Belmarsh wedding to his skateboarding round Ecuador’s embassy, Ithaka tells the story of the WikiLeaks founder’s extradition battle, through the eyes of his hard-campaigning fatherThe poem Ithaka, written in 1911 by the Greek writer Constantine Cavafy, opens with the lines: “As you set out for Ithaka / hope that your journey is a long one / full of adventure, full of discovery.” It has given a new documentary about Julian Assange both its title and, in many ways, its theme. The film follows Assange’s 76-year-old father, John Shipton, on his own long and winding road to try to save his son from US jail on espionage charges, resulting from the state secrets revealed by WikiL..

The Guardian > Law ‘There were plans to poison Julian’: Ithaka, the film charting Assange’s fight for freedom

Archie Battersbee’s parents win court of appeal fight in life-support case

Family of 12-year-old challenged ruling Archie is brain-stem dead and treatment can be stoppedThe parents of Archie Battersbee have won an appeal against ending the 12-year-old’s life support treatment.A high court judge had ruled that Archie, who sustained brain damage about three months ago, was ”brain-stem dead” after a hospital trust asked it to decide what was in his best interests. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Archie Battersbee’s parents win court of appeal fight in life-support case

Dominic Raab says right to abortion does not need to be in bill of rights

Deputy PM says matter is ‘settled in UK law’ and he would not want Britain to be in same situation as USDominic Raab has expressed doubts about including the right to an abortion in the forthcoming bill of rights, saying the matter was already “settled in UK law”.A cross-party amendment intends to enshrine the right in the bill, though abortion in England and Wales was decriminalised in the 1967 Abortion Act, which exempts women from prosecution for the procedure if it is signed off by two doctors. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Dominic Raab says right to abortion does not need to be in bill of rights

Europeans are overwhelmingly pro-choice, but that doesn’t mean women’s rights are safe | Anna Grzymala-Busse

Roe v Wade was overturned in the US by a court, not by voters. The same happened in Poland – and it could happen againAbortion access is about to be severely curtailed or cut off for millions of women in the United States following the supreme court’s decision to abolish the constitutional protections for the termination of pregnancy established by the landmark Roe v Wade case 50 years ago.The decision allows state legislatures to ban abortion and half are now likely to limit access. Anna Grzymala-Busse is a professor of political science at Stanford UniversityDo you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 300 words to be consid..

The Guardian > Law Europeans are overwhelmingly pro-choice, but that doesn’t mean women’s rights are safe | Anna Grzymala-Busse

No one but Ghislaine Maxwell is to blame for her revolting crimes | Dorothy Byrne

Jailed for 20 years yesterday, the procurer was a wicked, greedy and depraved criminal that no childhood troubles can excuseThe British former socialite and convicted procurer Ghislaine Maxwell has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for charges of recruiting and trafficking young girls.It is a significant sentence that reflects the enormity of what the judge called her “heinous” crimes. In the weeks leading up to her sentencing, her lawyers presented arguments for her mitigation. Much of this was a lengthy description of Maxwell’s unhappy childhood. Before you get your hankies out and declare, “Ah, that explains it”, I will remind you of what Maxwell was convicted: conspiracy to ..

The Guardian > Law No one but Ghislaine Maxwell is to blame for her revolting crimes | Dorothy Byrne

Queen’s approval of laws must be more transparent, Scottish ministers told

Holyrood aims to open up opaque mechanism after Guardian revealed secret influence on draft legislationScottish ministers have been told to open up the opaque mechanism in which the Queen gives her approval to draft bills that affect her personal property and public powers.Parliamentary authorities at Holyrood have instituted changes after a Guardian investigation revealed that proposed laws have almost certainly been secretly altered to secure the monarch’s approval. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Queen’s approval of laws must be more transparent, Scottish ministers told

The Tory bill of rights is a gift to the world’s tyrants | Letters

Leaders of repressive regimes will have licence to ignore international human rights standards, warns Mike Cushman. Plus letters from Prof Julian Petley and Margaret OwenYour editorial on the Tories’ new bill of rights (22 June) makes many important points. It is, however, like almost all of the discussion of this threat to human rights, depressingly narrow and inward-looking. The great danger here is the licence that putting national prejudices above international overviews will give to regimes more directly repressive that our own.International human rights law is designed to put constraints on the most authoritarian governments. It does this in part by more liberal countries accepting r..

The Guardian > Law The Tory bill of rights is a gift to the world’s tyrants | Letters

There’s no rest for the wicket watchers | Brief letters

Esoteric cricket questions | The Train (1964) | Barristers’ wages and wigs | Pretty Flamingo singer | Ursula von der Leyen’s one-legged standThe question of whether Jamie Overton taking Devon Conway’s wicket in the third England v New Zealand Test was the first instance of someone dismissing a batsman with the same name as the county of his birth (23 June) inevitably set me thinking, as pointlessly esoteric cricket questions always should. No, is, as I rather hoped, the answer: in the second innings of the England v Queensland match in Brisbane in 1979, Martin Kent was dismissed by Graham Dilley (born in Dartford in 1959).Graham CosterAuthor, The Nature of Cricket• No mention of The ..

The Guardian > Law There’s no rest for the wicket watchers | Brief letters

Labour MP in bid to include right to abortion in British bill of rights

Stella Creasy says she expects MPs to be given free vote on amendment as a matter of conscienceThe Labour MP Stella Creasy has said she will table an amendment to the forthcoming British bill of rights to give women the fundamental right to an abortion.Creasy said she would expect MPs to be given a free vote on the issue, as a matter of conscience. She told the Guardian the amendment would be tabled when the bill is published at second reading. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Labour MP in bid to include right to abortion in British bill of rights

The US supreme court is letting prayer back in public schools. This is unsettling | Moira Donegan

The court’s rightwing majority was extremely receptive to a case this week that would weaken the separation of church and stateOn Monday, the United States supreme court overturned decades of precedent governing the separation of church and state, and achieved one of the most long-standing goals of the Christian right: the return of official Christian prayer to public schools. Kennedy v Bremerton School District had a strange path to the supreme court. Initially filed in 2015, the case concerns Joseph Kennedy, formerly a public high school football coach from a Seattle suburb, who sued the community that used to employ him for religious discrimination after the school objected to his habit..

The Guardian > Law The US supreme court is letting prayer back in public schools. This is unsettling | Moira Donegan

‘Bought like a chicken’: struggle to end wahaya slavery in Niger

Al-Husseina Amadou was just one of thousands of girls in west Africa who are still bought cheaply as a wahaya, or ‘fifth wife’ al-Husseina Amadou never forgets the day she was sold. Like her parents, she was born into slavery in southern Niger. Forty-five years ago, when she was 15, a wealthy businessman from across the border in Nigeria arrived and bought her from her family’s master as a “fifth wife” or wahaya.“My parents had no say,” she recalls. “I was just a girl and he bought me like a chicken in the market. When I left with him, I was crying with my mother.” Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law ‘Bought like a chicken’: struggle to end wahaya slavery in Niger

‘If you love or are a woman, don’t go to Malta,’ say couple in abortion drama

After her ‘babymoon’ became a tragic medical crisis, Andrea Prudente wants to use her story to oppose bans on abortionWhen Andrea Prudente was sitting in a Maltese hospital waiting for her foetus’s heart to stop beating, she was offered grief counselling. Prudente, an American photographer, began to miscarry her pregnancy at 16 weeks during a holiday with her partner on the Mediterranean island, and had been told there was no hope for it.But because of the heartbeat – and despite Prudente’s own life-threatening risk of haemorrhage and infection – doctors at the Mater Dei hospital in Msida would not intervene to end her very wanted pregnancy. Malta’s ban on abortion in all circu..

The Guardian > Law ‘If you love or are a woman, don’t go to Malta,’ say couple in abortion drama

Louisiana judge blocks abortion ban amid uproar after Roe v Wade ruling

State temporarily blocked from enforcing ban as other US states pass ‘trigger laws’ designed to severely curtail access to abortionA Louisiana judge on Monday temporarily stopped the state from enforcing Republican-backed laws banning abortion, set to take effect after the US supreme court ended the constitutional right to the procedure last week.Louisiana is one of 13 states which passed “trigger laws”, to ban or severely restrict abortions once the supreme court overturned the 1973 Roe v Wade ruling that recognized a right to the procedure. It did so on Friday, stoking uproar among progressives and protests and counter-protests on the streets of major cities. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Louisiana judge blocks abortion ban amid uproar after Roe v Wade ruling

US supreme court rules in favor of high school football coach over on-field prayers – as it happened

Joseph Kennedy’s first amendment rights violated – court Biden urged to use executive action to shore up abortion accessSign up to receive First Thing – our daily briefing by emailWriting for the majority, Justice Neil Gorsuch argued that football coach Joseph Kennedy had a right to publicly pray after games because he was not requiring others to participate in the practice.“Joseph Kennedy lost his job as a high school football coach because he knelt at midfield after games to offer a quiet prayer of thanks,” Gorsuch wrote. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law US supreme court rules in favor of high school football coach over on-field prayers – as it happened

Supreme court sides with high school coach who led on-field prayers

Ruling expands religious rights of government employees in latest of decisions taking a broad view of religious libertyThe US supreme court’s conservative majority on Monday sided with a former public high-school football coach who lost his job for praying with players at the 50-yard line after games.The 6-3 ruling, with the court’s liberals in dissent, represented a victory for Christian conservative activists seeking to expand the role of prayer and religion in public schools. In its decision, the court ruled that the school district had violated the constitutional rights of the coach, Joseph Kennedy, when it suspended his employment after he refused to stop praying on the field. Conti..

The Guardian > Law Supreme court sides with high school coach who led on-field prayers

‘The system is in crisis’: barristers make their case as strike begins

Outside Manchester crown court, legal workers bemoan low pay and an ‘unsustainable’ justice systemUsually one of the busiest courts in the country, the corridors of Manchester crown court were unusually quiet.Outside, dozens of criminal law barristers gathered at the entrance in their gowns and wigs to mark the beginning of a strike across England and Wales over pay and an “unsustainable” justice system. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law ‘The system is in crisis’: barristers make their case as strike begins

Queen’s secret influence on laws revealed in Scottish government memo

Exclusive: Internal memo admits ‘it is almost certain’ laws altered to secure monarch’s consentA Scottish government memo obtained by the Guardian reveals that “it is almost certain” draft laws have been secretly changed to secure the Queen’s approval.Under an arcane mechanism known as Queen’s consent, the monarch is routinely given advance sight of proposed laws that could affect her personal property and public powers. Unlike the better-known procedure of royal assent, a formality that marks the moment when a bill becomes law, Queen’s consent must be sought before the relevant legislation can be approved by parliament. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Queen’s secret influence on laws revealed in Scottish government memo

Republicans have hijacked the US supreme court. It’s time to expand it | David Daley

If Amy Coney Barrett serves to Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s age, she will be a justice until 2059. We must reform the court now, or risk it losing its legitimacy foreverWhen the US supreme court this week radically expanded the second amendment and declared most any restrictions on guns to be presumptively unconstitutional, then overturned five decades of reproductive rights and created a likely desert for abortion access all the way from Idaho to Florida, America’s grim new reality became painfully clear.An extreme conservative majority holds absolute control over the court. They will likely hold this power for multiple generations. They intend to use it to impose a far-right vision that most ..

The Guardian > Law Republicans have hijacked the US supreme court. It’s time to expand it | David Daley

Criminal barristers begin strike in row over legal aid fees

The CBA says the offer of a 15% uplift in fees is insufficient and is calling for a 25% rise to make up for years of funding cutsCriminal barristers in England and Wales are to begin a strike over legal aid fees on Monday, as they warn the profession is facing an “existential crisis” because of inadequate funding.The Criminal Bar Association (CBA) said the offer of a 15% uplift in fees, which was the minimum increase recommended by the criminal legal aid review (Clar), is insufficient after swingeing cuts – and will not apply to the backlog of 58,000 cases in crown courts. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Criminal barristers begin strike in row over legal aid fees

Why are criminal barristers in England and Wales striking and what will be the impact?

The series of strikes over a legal aid funding row comes amid a huge backlog of cases in the crown courtsCriminal barristers in England and Wales begin a series of strikes over legal aid funding on Monday. We explain why they are striking and what the impact is likely to be. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Law Why are criminal barristers in England and Wales striking and what will be the impact?