‘Poisonous’: how WhatsApp is exposing UK school children to bullying and harmful content

Teachers say they are powerless to deal with damaging elements of social media and are calling for more parental vigilanceVictoria Tully, co-headteacher at Fulham Cross girls’ school, a state secondary in west London, had no idea that her new first years had invited people from outside the school to join their WhatsApp group.She only found out when a “strange man” shared “horrible pictures” with the 11-year-olds and someone alerted a teacher. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education ‘Poisonous’: how WhatsApp is exposing UK school children to bullying and harmful content

English universities face fines over dropout and employment rates

Criteria on career outcomes, drop-out rates and degree attainment unveiled for system of sanctionsUniversities will face sanctions if not enough students go on to graduate-level jobs within 15 months, if too many drop out or fail to earn degrees, England’s higher education regulator has warned.The Office for Students published its new tests of “low quality” subjects that could see large fines or deregistration imposed on universities where fewer than 60% of graduates in a university’s subject area fail to find work, set up their own business or go on to further study after finishing their course, with allowances made for those with caring responsibilities or travelling. Continue read..

The Guardian > Education English universities face fines over dropout and employment rates

The Trevor Project teams up with a student surveillance company accused of LGBTQ+ bias

Many fear the partnership is a ‘seal of approval’ for a company whose surveillance tech disproportionately harms LGBTQ+ youthAmid warnings from lawmakers and civil rights groups that digital surveillance tools could discriminate against at-risk students, a leading nonprofit devoted to the mental wellbeing of LGBTQ+ youth has formed a financial partnership with a tech company that subjects them to persistent online monitoring.Beginning in May, the Trevor Project, a high-profile nonprofit focused on suicide prevention among LGBTQ+ youth, began to list Gaggle as a “corporate partner” on its website, disclosing that the controversial surveillance company had given them between $25,000 (..

The Guardian > Education The Trevor Project teams up with a student surveillance company accused of LGBTQ+ bias

Behaviour adviser urges English schools to crack down on pupils’ vaping

Headteachers say more children are using vapes, forcing them to take action to tackle the problemThe government’s school behaviour adviser has called on headteachers to crack down on vaping among pupils, calling it “a huge health hazard” and an “enormous distraction”, amid reports that more children are using the devices, including some of primary age.Tom Bennett said vaping was now as big an issue in schools as cigarettes once were, with children becoming “addicted to the practice and the chemicals involved”. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Behaviour adviser urges English schools to crack down on pupils’ vaping

England’s A-level and GCSE grades to fall to pre-Covid levels in 2023

Some warn about impact on disadvantaged students, who suffered greatest learning loss during pandemicA-level and GCSE grades awarded in 2023 will be lower on average than this summer, the Department for Education has announced, as it confirmed plans to return grades to pre-pandemic levels.While the DfE and Ofqual, the exam regulator for England, said some help would stay in place for those whose learning was disrupted, school leaders and experts warned that those student most badly affected by Covid were most likely to suffer from the downward adjustment. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education England’s A-level and GCSE grades to fall to pre-Covid levels in 2023

Labour promise of free breakfasts ‘first step on the road to rebuilding childcare’

Shadow education secretary Bridget Phillipson to announce plan to fund breakfast clubs in every primary schoolLabour will rebuild a new childcare system to ease the pressure on parents from the “end of parental leave right through to the end of primary school”, shadow education secretary Bridget Phillipson said, starting with a pledge on free breakfast clubs.Phillipson will announce on Wednesday that fully funded breakfast clubs for every primary school in England would be funded by the revenues raised by restoring the top rate of income tax to 45p, if Labour were elected. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Labour promise of free breakfasts ‘first step on the road to rebuilding childcare’

Fossil fuel recruiters banned from UK university careers service

Exclusive: Birkbeck, University of London, is first institution to blacklist firms ‘most responsible for destroying the planet’Fossil fuel companies have been banned from recruiting students through a university careers service for the first time. The new policy from Birkbeck, University of London, states its careers service “will not hold relationships of any kind with oil, gas or mining companies”.The decision follows a campaign, supported by the student-led group People & Planet, to cut off recruitment pathways to fossil fuel companies. The campaign is now active in dozens of UK universities. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Fossil fuel recruiters banned from UK university careers service

Most students think UK universities protect free speech, survey finds

King’s College London finds 65% believe campuses places of ‘robust debate’ – but growing number disagreesMost UK students say their universities are places of free speech and debate – although a growing number are aware of free speech being restricted on campus, a study published by King’s College London has found.The analysis, by KCL’s Policy Institute, found that 65% of students agreed that “free speech and robust debate are well protected in my university”, a higher proportion than the 63% who felt that way in a survey three years ago. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Most students think UK universities protect free speech, survey finds

Making your university room into a home from home

With just a little imagination and the practical touch, you can make your student accommodation feel comforting and familiarThe 2023 league tableRegardless of where you spend your first semester – halls, student housing, or at home – you’ll be surprised how much time you spend in your own room. School is an all-day affair; at university, the days are more fractured, so the onus to study (or whatever you came to university to do) is on you.Expect a lot of down time in your room. Your bedroom is your sanctuary, but unless you’re in shared housing or staying at home, it’s also your only personal space, so treat it like a mini home. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Making your university room into a home from home

Pennsylvania school district accused of banning Girls Who Code book series

Pen America says Central York school district banned the books but officials strongly deny it in statementA school district in Pennsylvania temporarily banned the Girls Who Code book series for young readers, according to an index of banned books compiled by the free expression non-profit, Pen America.The books are four of more than 1,500 unique book titles that have been banned by various schools across the country after conservative pushes to censor books. According to a report released by Pen America in April, 138 school districts across 32 states have banned books from their classrooms and school libraries, sometimes temporarily, even if only for a day, sometimes on an ongoing basis. Con..

The Guardian > Education Pennsylvania school district accused of banning Girls Who Code book series

Ofsted raises concerns over use of restraints on pupils in special needs school

Warren school in Lowestoft judged ‘inadequate’ and put into special measures after inspectionConcerns over the use of physical restraint on pupils with complex special educational needs at a school in Suffolk have been raised by inspectors in a highly critical report.Warren school in Lowestoft, which caters for pupils aged three to 19 who have a wide range of complex special educational needs and disabilities, was judged “inadequate” in all areas and put into special measures after inspection by Ofsted, the schools watchdog for England. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Ofsted raises concerns over use of restraints on pupils in special needs school

Long days, long weekends: the four-day week takes off in US schools

The shorter school week is increasingly popular for rural school districts trying to recruit teachers. But what does it mean for students and families? On fall Fridays at Hull-Daisetta high school, in the small town of Daisetta in south-east Texas, sneakers squeak across the volleyball court as the Lady Cats run warm-up drills. Football coaches, players and cheerleaders prep for the night’s game. A local church serves lunch for the students. But there are no classes, and in the parking lot, just a handful of teachers’ cars.Hull-Daisetta is one of a growing number of US schools – at least 1,600 in 24 states, according to a 2021 study, up from just 257 in 1999 – that have moved to a fo..

The Guardian > Education Long days, long weekends: the four-day week takes off in US schools

Discounts, banking and budgeting: managing your finances at uni

From bank accounts to discount cards to finding part-time work, here’s how to stay on top of your finances while you studyThe 2023 league tableBeing skint has long been a part of the student experience, but with the cost of living crisis squeezing finances, young people preparing for university are more worried about budgeting than in previous years.According to the latest research by student discount scheme Unidays, 40% of Gen Z students depend on parental support and loans, with this generation “hit hard” by the current crisis. A survey by Save the Student showed that 76% of undergraduates were worried about making ends meet last year, with the figure expected to rise as prices conti..

The Guardian > Education Discounts, banking and budgeting: managing your finances at uni

‘The kids are just happier’: could California’s universal school meal program start a trend?

Parents, teachers and anti-hunger advocates hail new free-meal system, saying it improves academic performance and wellbeingBefore California became the first state to implement a universal meals program for its 6.2 million public school students, Alyssa Wells would keep granola bars in her classroom for students who complained of being hungry.When the new program began in August at Foussat elementary school in Oceanside, California, which is primarily attended by Latino students from low-income families, the teacher noticed immediate changes in her students. “The kids are eating way more and they’re more focused, eager to learn and they’re just happier,” she said. “They’ve got o..

The Guardian > Education ‘The kids are just happier’: could California’s universal school meal program start a trend?

Students warned to beware hidden costs of bill-splitting firms

Handing over the ‘boring stuff’ to a third party when sharing a house at university comes with its risksFor students moving into shared accommodation this month, it’s an alluring prospect: the chance to dump the headache of bills on to a friendly agent who will sign the household up to essential utilities, roll the charges into a fixed monthly sum, and then bill each housemate separately for their share.Bill-splitting companies pledge to take the hassle out of student life, removing the stress of ensuring tenants pay their share. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Students warned to beware hidden costs of bill-splitting firms

How might things have turned out if the Romans had stayed in Britain?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical conceptsHow might things have turned out if the Romans had stayed in Britain? Jane ShawPost your answers (and new questions) below or send them to nq@theguardian.com. A selection will be published next Sunday. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education How might things have turned out if the Romans had stayed in Britain?

School must be fun, but why won’t my son talk about it?

What do I have to do to persuade my son to tell me something, anything about his day at school?‘No’ my son says when I ask if he had lunch today. ‘No’ when I ask him if he did any drawing. ‘No’ when I ask him if he’s made any friends, ‘no’ if he’s at least learned a single classmate’s name and ‘no’ if he’s even once all day sat down at a desk. We were warned about this during his induction, the self-same session where roughly 20% of the presentation we received seemed to be about making sure we didn’t follow our kids into the classroom, weeping, ourselves.There, his incoming teachers said that shock to the system of so many new faces and activities could create ..

The Guardian > Education School must be fun, but why won’t my son talk about it?

Which UK university should I apply to?

It can feel overwhelming deciding where to go, especially after the uncertainty of the past two years, but experts have a simple message: relaxThe 2023 league tableYou could be forgiven for feeling that there’s a lot of doom and gloom around at the moment. Open a newspaper and you’ll read about the cost-of-living crisis, an economic recession, and how intergenerational unfairness is making it hard for young people to start a family and buy their own homes.All of which can lead you to feel stressed about achieving the highest grades possible at school, getting into the most competitive courses at the most selective universities, and into a graduate job with the highest salary. Continue re..

The Guardian > Education Which UK university should I apply to?

Zoom classes: how to cash in on your skills

From yoga and art to web development, use your interests to create income by teaching onlineFrom designing a website to perfecting a sun salutation or baking sourdough bread, taking an online masterclass became mainstream during the coronavirus pandemic and they continue to be big business.Many are “side hustles” by the class teacher, who uses the cash from ticket sales to supplement their normal income. So, with living costs rising, do you have skills or specialist knowledge that could be turned into a lucrative masterclass or webinar? Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Zoom classes: how to cash in on your skills

Choosing a university foundation year to kickstart a degree

From classics to Formula 1, and from hating education to loving it, a foundation year can turn your life aroundThe 2023 league tableBecky Reavell was in the crowd at Silverstone watching a Formula One race with her father when it dawned on her that she didn’t want to study English at university and be a journalist. What she really wanted was to study engineering for a career in motor sport.Her sixth-form teachers were supportive, but the problem was her A-level choices. She was already deep into studying English literature, classics and economics, not maths and physics, the subjects usually required for engineering. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Choosing a university foundation year to kickstart a degree

How to use the Guardian University Guide 2023

Don’t be overwhelmed by the choice on offer – use this guide to help make a selectionThe 2023 league tableView the full guideWelcome to the Guardian University Guide 2023. Life is feeling closer to normal after nearly three years of disruption, which means prospective students can look forward to enjoying everything university has to offer. That means working hard, but also making new friends, discovering new interests and – just as importantly – having fun. This guide is here to help you figure out what matters most to you.Unlike other league tables, the Guardian rankings focus on the things students care about, such as good teaching and job prospects, rather than basing them on aca..

The Guardian > Education How to use the Guardian University Guide 2023

Methodology behind the Guardian University Guide 2023

The compiler of the Guardian university league tables explains the technicalities of the processThe main table and subject tablesHow to use the Guardian University GuideDownload the spreadsheetsView the full guideWe use nine measures of performance, covering all stages of the student life cycle, to put together a league table for 66 subjects. We regard each provider of a subject as a department and ask each provider to tell us which of their students count within each department.Our intention is to indicate how each department is likely to deliver a positive all-round experience to future students and in order to assess this we refer to how past students in the department have fared.31 subje..

The Guardian > Education Methodology behind the Guardian University Guide 2023

Guardian University Guide 2023: find your subject

League tables of all subject areas taught at UK universities, and profiles of those subjectsGuardian University Guide 2023 - overall tableView the full guideHow to use the tablesAccounting and financeThe league tableWhat the subject is aboutAerospace engineeringThe league tableWhat the subject is about Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Guardian University Guide 2023: find your subject

From bee-keeping to ghost-hunting: why uni is all about extracurriculars

There are hundreds of extracurricular activities to choose from, which could not only spark a new passion but also impress future employersThe 2023 league tableWhen Harriet Owen arrived at university, she made the unusual decision to join the bee-keeping society, despite having no previous knowledge. “I looked through all the societies online, saw bee-keeping and thought, ‘Oh interesting, bees are cool,’” she says.Owen, 21, who studies biomaterials science at the University of Sheffield, decided to get stuck in. She’s since learned to do hive checks and to spot the queen (she’s much bigger) and has made wax candles and honey cakes. “Bees are so good for the environment,” she ..

The Guardian > Education From bee-keeping to ghost-hunting: why uni is all about extracurriculars

Forget Oxbridge: St Andrews knocks top universities off perch

Latest Guardian University Guide shows leading trio are in league of their own for undergraduate coursesThe 2023 rankings in fullOxbridge is being replaced at the apex of UK universities by “Stoxbridge” after St Andrews overtook Oxford and Cambridge at the top of the latest Guardian University Guide.It is the first time the Fife university has been ranked highest in the Guardian’s annual guide to undergraduate courses, pushing Oxford into second and Cambridge into third. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Forget Oxbridge: St Andrews knocks top universities off perch

Social mobility tsar casts doubt over grammar school revival in England

Katharine Birbalsingh says disadvantaged pupils with few resources struggle to win placesThe UK’s social mobility tsar has cast doubt on Liz Truss’s plans to revive grammar schools in England, arguing that they mainly benefit children whose families can afford to coach them to pass entrance exams.Katharine Birbalsingh, the headteacher named last year by Truss as chair of the government’s social mobility commission, said selective schools educated few disadvantaged or working-class pupils because they struggled to win places. Continue reading...

The Guardian > Education Social mobility tsar casts doubt over grammar school revival in England

British Film Institute launches 10-year Screen Culture and lottery funding strategies

A new streaming service, BFI+, plus investment in film education in schools and access to its archives are all part of the BFI’s new plan• ‘If we get most of our information from screens, integrity matters’: meet Ben Roberts, the most important man in British filmThe British Film Institute is to create a new streaming service called BFI+, use national lottery funds to invest in film education in schools, and open up access to its research collections via Screen Archive of the Future as part of a new 10-year strategy announced on Friday.Entitled Screen Culture 2033, the BFI’s plan is designed to “transform access to its unique and valuable collections, cultural and education progr..

The Guardian > Education British Film Institute launches 10-year Screen Culture and lottery funding strategies