Disc, Discipline of Linguistics in Fiction?

I was wondering whether there are good fictionalized descriptions of the work of linguists that you are aware of? I am just reading Pip Williams' novel The Dictionary of Lost Words, which in part describes the work on the OED by James Murray (and others, of course), but then takes an interesting feminist slant. Lexicography is not my specialty, but I found the description absolutely fascinating. Is there anything else in the world of fiction that deals with other areas of linguistics, with lingu

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Discipline of Linguistics in Fiction?

I was wondering whether there are good fictionalized descriptions of the work of linguists that you are aware of? I am just reading Pip Williams' novel The Dictionary of Lost Words, which in part describes the work on the OED by James Murray (and others, of course), but then takes an interesting feminist slant. Lexicography is not my specialty, but I found the description absolutely fascinating. Is there anything else in the world of fiction that deals with other areas of linguistics, with lingu

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Author Reply to Review of “The Linguistics Wars” 33.3261

Harris reply to Rogers review at https://linguistlist.org/issues/33.3261/ LINGUIST list (LL) and “The Linguistics Wars” both came on the scene in the early 1990s as the Internet was slouching toward the World Wide Web but before it had yet got there. It was a fortuitous convergence. John Lawler reviewed the book in LINGUIST 4.644, quickly sparking some really interesting and occasionally contentious discussions (in issues 4.644, 4.649, 4.654, 4.658, 4.671, 4.722) of a sort that were unknown

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Author Reply to Review of “The Linguistics Wars” 33.3261

Harris reply to Rogers review at https://linguistlist.org/issues/33.3261/ LINGUIST list (LL) and “The Linguistics Wars” both came on the scene in the early 1990s as the Internet was slouching toward the World Wide Web but before it had yet got there. It was a fortuitous convergence. John Lawler reviewed the book in LINGUIST 4.644, quickly sparking some really interesting and occasionally contentious discussions (in issues 4.644, 4.649, 4.654, 4.658, 4.671, 4.722) of a sort that were unknown bef

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Author Reply to Review of “The Linguistics Wars” 33.3261

Harris reply to Rogers review at https://linguistlist.org/issues/33.3261/ LINGUIST list (LL) and “The Linguistics Wars” both came on the scene in the early 1990s as the Internet was slouching toward the World Wide Web but before it had yet got there. It was a fortuitous convergence. John Lawler reviewed the book in LINGUIST 4.644, quickly sparking some really interesting and occasionally contentious discussions (in issues 4.644, 4.649, 4.654, 4.658, 4.671, 4.722) of a sort that were unknown bef

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Language Attrition in Second Languages

How worried should a bilingual person be about language attrition if one of the languages they’re fluent in is English? Persons native language is a South Slavic language, however they started learning and using English at age 3, moved to an English speaking country at 18 and been here for over 13 years. They are fully bilingual, as their day to day interactions are in English however they speak their native language frequently enough that it’s as natural as it once was. They think and dre

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Language Attrition in Second Languages

How worried should a bilingual person be about language attrition if one of the languages they’re fluent in is English? Persons native language is a South Slavic language, however they started learning and using English at age 3, moved to an English speaking country at 18 and been here for over 13 years. They are fully bilingual, as their day to day interactions are in English however they speak their native language frequently enough that it’s as natural as it once was. They think and dream i

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Language Attrition in Second Languages

How worried should a bilingual person be about language attrition if one of the languages they’re fluent in is English? Persons native language is a South Slavic language, however they started learning and using English at age 3, moved to an English speaking country at 18 and been here for over 13 years. They are fully bilingual, as their day to day interactions are in English however they speak their native language frequently enough that it’s as natural as it once was. They think and dream i

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Multilingual Literacy Mediators

Fellow Linguists, (this is a repeated request and thank you for the responses I have had so far) I wonder if you may be able to help with a research project I am currently engaged in. I am looking for any examples of literacy mediators (Barton 2007, Street 1993 and 2001, Papen 2005a) who are able to read (decode) for someone whose language they do not know. For example, reading a letter in, say, Kikuyu by an English speaker who attempts a rough approximation of the written words in a lette

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Multilingual Literacy Mediators

Fellow Linguists, (this is a repeated request and thank you for the responses I have had so far) I wonder if you may be able to help with a research project I am currently engaged in. I am looking for any examples of literacy mediators (Barton 2007, Street 1993 and 2001, Papen 2005a) who are able to read (decode) for someone whose language they do not know. For example, reading a letter in, say, Kikuyu by an English speaker who attempts a rough approximation of the written words in a letter wr

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Multilingual Literacy Mediators

Fellow Linguists, (this is a repeated request and thank you for the responses I have had so far) I wonder if you may be able to help with a research project I am currently engaged in. I am looking for any examples of literacy mediators (Barton 2007, Street 1993 and 2001, Papen 2005a) who are able to read (decode) for someone whose language they do not know. For example, reading a letter in, say, Kikuyu by an English speaker who attempts a rough approximation of the written words in a letter wr

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Debate about Structural Bias in German Dialectology

My public talk on Austrian German for ascina.at from August 2021, announced and recorded at https://linguistlist.org/issues/32.2852/, has triggered a public statement from some of the colleagues whose practice I criticize. In a one-page response I stress that I view the issue as entirely structural, not personal, though, of course, structural views are upheld by individual practice in German dialectology. My response can be read here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/356542159_Respon

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Debate about Structural Bias in German Dialectology

My public talk on Austrian German for ascina.at from August 2021, announced and recorded at https://linguistlist.org/issues/32.2852/, has triggered a public statement from some of the colleagues whose practice I criticize. In a one-page response I stress that I view the issue as entirely structural, not personal, though, of course, structural views are upheld by individual practice in German dialectology. My response can be read here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/356542159_Response_

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Debate about Structural Bias in German Dialectology

My public talk on Austrian German for ascina.at from August 2021, announced and recorded at https://linguistlist.org/issues/32.2852/, has triggered a public statement from some of the colleagues whose practice I criticize. In a one-page response I stress that I view the issue as entirely structural, not personal, though, of course, structural views are upheld by individual practice in German dialectology. My response can be read here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/356542159_Response_

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Non-native Speakers in Philosophy

Dear all Please do not hesitate to sign and/or distribute this manifesto of commitments I have prepared, seeking to improve the situation non-native speakers currently face in analytic philosophy: https://contesi.wordpress.com/bp/ All faculty and students are most welcome to sign. Many thanks in advance, Filippo (Contesi) — F. Contesi Beatriu de Pinós Postdoctoral Fellow LOGOS Research Group in Analytic Philosophy Universitat de Barcelona Barcelona Principles for a Globall

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Disc: Literacy Mediators

Fellow Linguists, I wonder if you may be able to help with a research project I am currently engaged in. I am looking for any examples of literacy mediators (Barton 2007, Street 1993 and 2001, Papen 2005a) who are able to read (decode) for someone whose language they do not know. For example, reading a letter in, say, Kikuyu by an English speaker who attempts a rough approximation of the written words in a letter written in Kikuyu using Roman script for a recipient/listener who is a Kikuyu sp

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Non-native Speakers in Philosophy

Dear all Please do not hesitate to sign and/or distribute this manifesto of commitments I have prepared, seeking to improve the situation non-native speakers currently face in analytic philosophy: https://contesi.wordpress.com/bp/ All faculty and students are most welcome to sign. Many thanks in advance, Filippo (Contesi) — F. Contesi Beatriu de Pinós Postdoctoral Fellow LOGOS Research Group in Analytic Philosophy Universitat de Barcelona Barcelona Principles for a Globally Inclusive Philo

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Literacy Mediators

Fellow Linguists, I wonder if you may be able to help with a research project I am currently engaged in. I am looking for any examples of literacy mediators (Barton 2007, Street 1993 and 2001, Papen 2005a) who are able to read (decode) for someone whose language they do not know. For example, reading a letter in, say, Kikuyu by an English speaker who attempts a rough approximation of the written words in a letter written in Kikuyu using Roman script for a recipient/listener who is a Kikuyu spea

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Non-native Speakers in Philosophy

Dear all Please do not hesitate to sign and/or distribute this manifesto of commitments I have prepared, seeking to improve the situation non-native speakers currently face in analytic philosophy: https://contesi.wordpress.com/bp/ All faculty and students are most welcome to sign. Many thanks in advance, Filippo (Contesi) — F. Contesi Beatriu de Pinós Postdoctoral Fellow LOGOS Research Group in Analytic Philosophy Universitat de Barcelona Barcelona Principles for a Globally Inclusive Philo

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Literacy Mediators

Fellow Linguists, I wonder if you may be able to help with a research project I am currently engaged in. I am looking for any examples of literacy mediators (Barton 2007, Street 1993 and 2001, Papen 2005a) who are able to read (decode) for someone whose language they do not know. For example, reading a letter in, say, Kikuyu by an English speaker who attempts a rough approximation of the written words in a letter written in Kikuyu using Roman script for a recipient/listener who is a Kikuyu spea

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Language, Dialect and Prescriptivism, Austria and Canada: 1700 to Present

A vibrant and friendly discussion is developing based on this paper: "Prescriptivism and national identity: history, theory and cross-linguistic analysis of non-dominant language varieties", submitted for The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Prescriptivism, edited by Joan C. Beal, Morana Lukač and Robin Straaijer The discussion will be live for another 18 days, with a possible extension by 3 weeks: https://www.academia.edu/s/6e8b5a08c5?source=link All welcome! Your feedback will be fed bac

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Language, Dialect and Prescriptivism, Austria and Canada: 1700 to Present

A vibrant and friendly discussion is developing based on this paper: "Prescriptivism and national identity: history, theory and cross-linguistic analysis of non-dominant language varieties", submitted for The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Prescriptivism, edited by Joan C. Beal, Morana Lukač and Robin Straaijer The discussion will be live for another 18 days, with a possible extension by 3 weeks: https://www.academia.edu/s/6e8b5a08c5?source=link All welcome! Your feedback will be fed back in

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Language, Dialect and Prescriptivism, Austria and Canada: 1700 to Present

A vibrant and friendly discussion is developing based on this paper: "Prescriptivism and national identity: history, theory and cross-linguistic analysis of non-dominant language varieties", submitted for The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Prescriptivism, edited by Joan C. Beal, Morana Lukač and Robin Straaijer The discussion will be live for another 18 days, with a possible extension by 3 weeks: https://www.academia.edu/s/6e8b5a08c5?source=link All welcome! Your feedback will be fed back in

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Debating ''The Pluricentricity Debate''

This positing relates to the discussion of the theory of pluricentricity, which was first facilitated on this list last year. For a summary, see https://linguistlist.org/issues/30/30-4080/ and relating postings. The theoretical and epistemological account behind that discussion, "Dollinger, Stefan. 2019. The Pluricentricity Debate: On Austrian German and Other Germanic Standard Varieties. New York: Routledge" has now been reviewed in Zeitschrift für Rezensionen der Germanistischen Sprachwiss

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Code-Switching in Context: English in Korean Hip Hop

Code-switching, the practice of alternating between two or more languages, has become a popular topic of study and discussion, focusing mostly on spontaneous and organic instances of code-switching. However, one sub-group in this massive topic that deserves more attention is the instances when switching from one language to another is planned and intentional. This is seen specifically in music, where artists often change languages in their lyrics for specific purposes. Korean popular music, o

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Debating ''The Pluricentricity Debate''

This positing relates to the discussion of the theory of pluricentricity, which was first facilitated on this list last year. For a summary, see https://linguistlist.org/issues/30/30-4080/ and relating postings. The theoretical and epistemological account behind that discussion, "Dollinger, Stefan. 2019. The Pluricentricity Debate: On Austrian German and Other Germanic Standard Varieties. New York: Routledge" has now been reviewed in Zeitschrift für Rezensionen der Germanistischen Sprachwissens

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc, Code-Switching in Context: English in Korean Hip Hop

Code-switching, the practice of alternating between two or more languages, has become a popular topic of study and discussion, focusing mostly on spontaneous and organic instances of code-switching. However, one sub-group in this massive topic that deserves more attention is the instances when switching from one language to another is planned and intentional. This is seen specifically in music, where artists often change languages in their lyrics for specific purposes. Korean popular music, or

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Debating ''The Pluricentricity Debate''

This positing relates to the discussion of the theory of pluricentricity, which was first facilitated on this list last year. For a summary, see https://linguistlist.org/issues/30/30-4080/ and relating postings. The theoretical and epistemological account behind that discussion, "Dollinger, Stefan. 2019. The Pluricentricity Debate: On Austrian German and Other Germanic Standard Varieties. New York: Routledge" has now been reviewed in Zeitschrift für Rezensionen der Germanistischen Sprachwissens

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Code-Switching in Context: English in Korean Hip Hop

Code-switching, the practice of alternating between two or more languages, has become a popular topic of study and discussion, focusing mostly on spontaneous and organic instances of code-switching. However, one sub-group in this massive topic that deserves more attention is the instances when switching from one language to another is planned and intentional. This is seen specifically in music, where artists often change languages in their lyrics for specific purposes. Korean popular music, or

The LINGUIST List > Discussions on Various Topics

Disc: Measuring Relatedness among Languages

I received an inquiry from a colleague in psychiatry who works with immigrants. He is asking if there is a way to measure the "distance" between languages in order to generate hypotheses about cognitive effort required to learn L2 when L1 is very different (i.e. from a different language family). Can anyone recommend literature on L2 acquisition that compares the grammatical, phonological etc. features of L1 and L2 to inform this potential argument that the more different two languages are, the

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